Dolomites in Infrared

A photographic journey under a different light spectrum
2016 - ongoing

ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY

Back in the Golden age of Analog Photography

False-color infrared photography became widely practiced during the 1940's with the introduction of Kodak Ektachrome Infrared Aero Film. The first version of this, known as Kodacolor Aero-Reversal-Film, was developed for military purposes.

Comparison Between a Regular Color Film shot and an Infrared Film

How does Color Infrared Film works ?

Kodak Aero Chrome and similar films captures invisible infrared light from the red end of the spectrum, light that’s not visible to the naked eye and characteristically turning green vegetation a bright red.

Genesis of the Project

As a child, I spent many winters and summers near the steep walls of the Dolomites.

I was thrilled by the idea to see the places where I grew up under a new light and the idea of using this fancy and discontinued film seemed the perfect fit for this project.

My first step was to research how to get the correct exposure. There is not much room for an error in this film due to its narrow latitude.
Also, I used two different kinds of filters that gave the vegetation a different hue,

Project's Achievements

Dolomites in Infrared has been featured on various online blogs and cherry on top on the cover and an internal section of "Mastering Film Photography" a complete compendium of analog photography by Chris Gatcum.

And now enjoy the journey

Back in the Golden age of Analog Photography

False-color infrared photography became widely practiced during the 1940's with the introduction of Kodak Ektachrome Infrared Aero Film. The first version of this film, known as Kodacolor Aero-Reversal-Film, was developed for military purposes.

Comparison Between a Regular Color Film shot and Infrared Film

How does Color Infrared Film works ?

Kodak Aero Chrome and similar films captures invisible infrared light from the red end of the spectrum, light that’s not visible to the naked eye and characteristically turning green vegetation a bright red.

How does Color Infrared Film works ?

Kodak Aero Chrome and similar films capture invisible infrared light from the red end of the spectrum, light that’s not visible to the naked eye and characteristically turning green vegetation a vibrant red.

The Process

As a child, I spent many winters and summers near the steep walls of the Dolomites.

I was thrilled by the chance to see the places where I grew up under a new light and the idea of using this fancy and discontinued film seemed the perfect fit for this project.

I started by doing research to find out how to expose the image correctly. Because of the narrow latitude of this film, there was little room for error.
Furthermore, I applied two different types of filters, and each of them created a different hue in the vegetation.

Project's Achievements

Dolomites in Infrared has been featured on numerous online blogs and was also published on the cover and inside a section of "Mastering Film Photography", a comprehensive guide to analog photography by Chris Gatcum.

And now enjoy the journey

✌ Let's work together

Sorry, this project is under construction

You can check the entire project from a desktop device

Take me back to Home

.mobile-menu { backdrop-filter: blur(30px); -webkit-backdrop-filter: blur(30px); }